Raised Bed Planter Garden

10 Reasons Why Raised Bed Planting Makes Good Sense.

With Spring in full swing, it’s time to get your hands dirty and dig into your garden and flower beds. Some folks are lucky enough to already have a designated space in their yard for planting flowers, veggies and greenery. For people without an existing garden, creating a new garden can be challenging.

Maybe you have a small yard and space is limited. Or, maybe the idea of investing time and effort to dig up a section of your yard, and then plant and maintain a full-size garden is more work than you’re ready for. This can be especially true if you’re a novice green thumb who’s not sure if gardening is your “your thing.”

Raised Bed Planters are an excellent alternative to digging a large garden—and our CASTLECREEK® Raised Bed Planters are perfect for planting smaller, easily manageable gardens that take up less space and require less labor to create.

Here are 10 great reasons why raised bed planters make good sense:

1. Dig this: No digging!

Raised Bed Planters can be placed wherever you like—without the need to dig up your yard. Just line the area with thick layers of newspaper or cardboard and you can plop your new garden down right on top of the turf. You can even place one on a patio or deck!

2. No tilling

Ever tilled up a garden? It’s hard work, even with a power tiller. With a raised bed planter, there’s no need for tilling. If you’re starting fresh, simply fill your container with loose soil. For plants that grow straight up, like tomatoes, keep the soil level with the top of the container. For flowers and blooming plants, leave some space between the dirt and the top of the bed.

3. Portability

Like in real estate, location is one of the most important factors to consider when planting a garden. The portability of a raised bed garden allows you to locate it where sunlight is optimal and the threat of flooding or constant wind won’t be a factor. Plus, if your garden doesn’t grow the way you hoped this season, you can easily move it to a new location next spring.

4. Plant earlier

Soil in raised bed planters tends to thaw quicker and dry out faster than soil at ground level. This allows you to transplant veggie seedlings earlier, which can be especially helpful if you live in an area where the growing season is short. Not only can you plant earlier with raised beds, you can also extend your growing season by easily adding hoop covers or cloche to your beds.

5. Easier on the knees and back

Tending to a ground-level garden can be murder on your knees and back, especially if you have mobility issues. Planting, weeding and harvesting a raised bed garden minimizes the stress and strain on your joints. You can even sit in a chair and work on a raised bed. Better yet, invest in a CASTLECREEK® Rolling Garden Seat to make planting and moving about your garden easier than ever.

6. You choose the soil

All soil is not made equal. Rather than trying to remedy poor soil in a ground-level garden, it’s much easier to simply fill your raised bed planter with the right soil from the get-go. An even mix of soil and compost is a good way to start. You can even use different types of soil in different beds, so you can tailor the soil to the plants you plant to grow.

7. Less worry about weeds

Ground-level gardens are loaded with weed seeds lying dormant in the soil. Spring tilling churns them up, and soon they’re sprouting everywhere. By filling a raised bed with the soil you choose, there’s a far less chance of weeds taking over. Plus, the loose soil of your raised bed makes the weeds that do pop up easier to remove.

8. Less worry about pests

Slugs, beetles, larvae and other pests find their way into your garden by crawling on the ground. Planting in a raised bed make it much more difficult for crawling critters to invade. In addition, you can line the bottom and sides of your bed with plastic to help deter soil parasites. Plus, raised beds are easier to inspect (the earlier you spot an infestation, the better) and more accessible to treat if you do encounter a problem with pests.

9. Good aeration and drainage

Filling your raised bed with loose, healthy soil gives roots room to breathe and helps them better absorb essential nutrients. Raised bed planters also drain better than ground-level gardens. Too much moisture can stifle root growth and promote bacterial and fungal diseases. The loose soil in raised beds allows rain water and moisture to seep into the bed, which prevents the loss of topsoil and allows excess moisture to drain away.

10. Your roots run deep

While the compacted soil of ground-level gardens promotes shallow root growth, the loose soil of a raised bed promotes deeper, well-developed root systems that are able to gather water and nutrients from a larger area. More of the good stuff means better growth and more productive results.

 

So there you have it—10 reasons a raised bed garden just might be right for you. With less labor, fewer weeds and fewer pests, better aeration and drainage, superior root growth, and the ability to place your garden wherever you like, raised bed planting makes good sense. With so many advantages, raised bed gardens can yield surprising—and often better—results than ground-level planting. Plus, any way you slice it, cultivating a raised bed garden is a lot less work. Consider planting one (or several!) this season and enjoy the beauty and bounty of growing your own flowers and fresh vegetables.

 

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