Awesome Time Lapse Footage of One Man Building a Log Cabin [VIDEO]

BrysquickhitsWe cull the internet in search of the latest outdoors-related tidbits, YouTube clips, photos, memes, you name it. Stuff you HAVEN’T seen before, hopefully. If it’s amusing, entertaining, educational or astonishing, you’ll find it here. Check back every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and see what’s new.

When the hustle and bustle of modern life starts to get you down, just watch today’s video.

At one point or another, all of us dream of leaving it all behind and living off the grid. Shawn James, outdoorsman and photographer, actually did it——and recorded nearly every step of the process for his YouTube channel.

In just 5 minutes, a small clearing in the woods near Algonquin Park, Canada, transforms into a homestead. No power tools of any kind were used. He did it all by hand.

Grab a cup of coffee, take a load off, and relax while you watch:

 

 

Really wonderful, isn’t it?

Shawn spent an entire summer cutting and notching the balsam fir and cedar logs off-site with a log scribe, axe, saw, adze and wood carving gouge.

When he was finished, he hauled it to his land near Algonquin Park.

“Once on site, I spent a month reassembling the cabin on a foundation of sand and gravel,” Shawn writes in the video description. “Once the log walls were up, I again used hand tools to shape every log, board and timber to erect the gable ends, the wood roof, the porch, the outhouse and a seemingly endless number of woodworking projects.”

Decades of carpentry and woodcraft are on display here. The notching alone, you have no idea how difficult it is. It HAS to be tight. Guys like Shawn and Dick Proenneke of “Alone In the Wilderness” (go watch it right now) make it look easy…but it sure ain’t.

Couple of interesting notes…for the roof, he uses a combination of tar paper and burnt wood——a process called shou sugi ban, a fire hardening wood preservation technique from Japan. Heck, even Dick Proenneke used poly for the roof. We wouldn’t blame any man for doing the same. The roof HAS to be water-tight.

There are longer videos of the process on his YouTube channel, so if this video got you interested, there’s plenty more to watch.

 

 

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2 Responses to “Awesome Time Lapse Footage of One Man Building a Log Cabin [VIDEO]”

  1. ARNOLD

    THE TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION THAT YOU ACCOMPLISHED SIR, SEEM TO BE A LOST ART TODAY. DID YOU USE A ESTABLISHED WRITTEN PLAN? WAS THIS YOUR FIRST BUILD OF THIS KIND? WHY DID YOU BURN THE WOOD FOR THE ROOF AND FLOOR, AND WILL IT SHED WATER BETTER, AFTER BURNING! ABSOLUTELY A BEAUTIFUL WORK OF ART, AND I KNOW YOU WILL ENJOY IT MORE, BECAUSE YOU BUILT IT YOURSELF! HOW LONG DID YOU TAKE TO COMPLETE IT? VERY INTERESTED IN YOUR PLANS, IF POSSIBLE.

    Reply
    • Bryan

      Bryan

      Hi Arnold—I’m glad you liked the video!

      I can’t take any credit for it. I just found it on YouTube and posted it here because I thought our customers would like it. The man who made it is named Shawn James. He has a YouTube channel where he posts all sorts of videos about the process of making the cabin.

      If you go to the actual YouTube video, Shawn is pretty good about answering questions. Link:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmYCUljsrDg

      The one question I *CAN* answer is about the charring of the wood. It’s a Japanese process called Shou Sugi Ban. By slightly charring the surface of the wood (cedar works best) without combusting the whole piece, the wood becomes waterproof through carbonization (and a little more durable too). Not to mention that it also looks great!

      Thanks again for watching and commenting. I hope you get your answers!

      Bryan

      Click the link

      Reply