Black Bear Knocks Down Tree [VIDEO]

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DJ Rankowsky of Northwest Montana was lucky enough to put his game cam in exactly the right place to catch a black bear knocking down a tree.

The tree was dead and rotted, but the bear still makes quick work of it.

Must be something in there that he wants, right?

 

Black bear knocks down tree

Check out this amazing game camera video – a foraging black bear is determined to knock down this tree to find what's inside! Taken in Northwest Montana.Video: DJ Rankowsy

Posted by ABC FOX Montana on Monday, July 29, 2019

 

So the question is: why? Why go through the trouble of knocking down a tree?

The answer is likely food-related. While black bears are foragers and largely consume vegetation for survival, they also like ants, grubs, bees and other insects. And, of course, honey.

There certainly could be a bee hive in there. Fun fact: once the hive is breached, the bear will gather the honeycomb with its paws and eat it despite the stings. Bears will even gnaw through trees if the hives are deeply set.

But the answer is most likely more mundane than honey. He’s probably just looking for bugs.

Hey, we all gotta eat.

 

 

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