Talk Turkeys With Shane Simpson!

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3/17/17 UPDATE: Thanks to everyone who tuned into our live broadcast! You can watch the video below.

On March 16th, we are hosting a LIVE demo and chat with champion turkey caller Shane Simpson! This Facebook Live video event will take place on our Facebook page and will feature calling tips as well as a Q/A session that YOU can be a part of!

From CallingAllTurkeys.com:

Shane Simpson experienced his first taste of turkey hunting in South Carolina at an early age and was instantly hooked for life. Moving to Minnesota in 2008, Simpson soon founded the company, “Calling All Turkeys” as a way to share turkey hunting knowledge and experiences. Calling All Turkeys is an action-packed, semi-live web-show featuring hunts from all over the country and primarily on publicly accessible lands.

In 2009, Simpson entered his first turkey calling contest and placed 3rd. He has since gone on to win more than 20 calling titles and has placed in numerous others, including winning the Minnesota State Calling Championship in 2011, 2015 and 2017 and he also placed 3rd in the 2015 Grand National Owl Hooting Championship.

Along with producing Calling All Turkeys, Simpson does freelance work for numerous hunting industry companies including Field & Stream and ScoutLook and he is also an outdoor writer with some of his work appearing in the National Wild Turkey Federation’s “Turkey Country” and “Jakes Country” magazines.

Stay tuned on our Facebook page for updates on the time (tentatively planned for afternoon). We are giving you the chance to submit your question in advance! Just write it in the comments below, and be sure to include your name and where you’re writing from. We will pick questions for Shane to read and respond to LIVE. What better way to prep for your turkey hunt!

Needless to say, we are pretty excited. This video will get YOU excited as well. So leave a question below and we will see you on the 16th!

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5 Responses to “Talk Turkeys With Shane Simpson!”

  1. john mckinney

    i want to learn how to do this have an old box call no success on a couple trips in the woods.

    Reply
  2. Chad Brady

    How well can Turkey’s smell? Sure seems they can find fresh tilled dirt or places that have been burnt very quickly. Makes me wonder if they can smell things better than we think.

    Reply
    • Jake Dybedahl

      Jake Dybedahl

      Good question! Here is Shane’s response:

      “Chad, As far as I know, turkeys can not smell, or it is so weak that it is pretty much useless. Tilled areas and burnt areas were probably already used by the turkeys occasionally, but with much more food available from each practice, the birds are likely just visible more because they are spending more time there.”

      Reply
  3. Brian Gilbert

    What word or words do you huff when making a yelp?I find if I use words beginning with “H” it helps me use the right air.

    Reply
    • Jake Dybedahl

      Jake Dybedahl

      Thanks for your question, Brian. Here is Shane’s response:

      “Brian, I usually tell folks to “hiss” like a cat. That places your tongue in the correct position and creates a small channel of air to activate the reeds.”

      Reply