Camping 101: All About Camper Cabins

“Camping” is a broad term, depending upon whom you ask. It can mean anything from a basic dome tent to an elaborate RV with side extensions and a microwave more powerful than the Voyager I spacecraft. Somewhere in-between is the ‘camper’ cabin.

Most camper cabins are modestly furnished.
Most camper cabins are modestly furnished. (Photos courtesy of Minnesota DNR)

Most camper cabins are modestly furnished.

Typically camper cabins are modestly equipped with a table and benches and a set of bunk beds. That’s it. They often have a deck or screened porch and often include electricity, heat and even air conditioning.

Elementary camping chores, such as running water, cooking and lavatory options, are usually not included or allowed inside the structure. Thus, campers must revert to basic outdoor tent camping options of water pump, picnic table and fire ring, conveniently located in the cabin’s front yard or only a few steps away.

Many of these cabins are available year-round making them options for winter cross-country skiing/snowshoe camping weekends. Others are seasonal, but available well into that state’s hunting seasons enabling hunters to have a warm, comfy retreat after a day in a tree stand or duck blind.

Rates for most cabins vary between about $60/night for non-electricity; $70-plus with electricity. Weekday and weekend rates also may vary as well as requirements for minimum/maximum stay.

Put it alongside a full-blown lake cottage, however, and it may seem quite spartan. They are, nonetheless, a cozy alternative to a tight-spaced, fabric-flapping tent.

Many states offer camper cabins, usually through their state or county park systems. State Department of Natural Resources offices usually have a listing of rental cabins throughout their parks or sometimes in state forests as well. Most often these cabins are adjacent to tent/RV campgrounds, while others offer a more remote setting that truly enhances the backwoods’ experience.

Typically camper cabins are modestly equipped with a table and benches and a set of bunk beds. That’s it. They often have a deck or screened porch and often include electricity, heat and even air conditioning.

Elementary camping chores, such as running water, cooking and lavatory options, are usually not included or allowed inside the structure. Thus, campers must revert to basic outdoor tent camping options of water pump, picnic table and fire ring, conveniently located in the cabin’s front yard or only a few steps away.

Many of these cabins are available year-round making them options for winter cross-country skiing/snowshoe camping weekends. Others are seasonal, but available well into that state’s hunting seasons enabling hunters to have a warm, comfy retreat after a day in a tree stand or duck blind.

Rates for most cabins vary between about $60/night for non-electricity; $70-plus with electricity. Weekday and weekend rates also may vary as well as requirements for minimum/maximum stay.

Some cabins are set up in cul-de-sacs or convenient clusters where patrons can drive right up to the front door while others have common parking lots and require a short walk-in to each unit. In either case, the cabins are aligned so each has the space and view that affords optimum privacy.

The rustic nature of these modest camper cabins can appeal to even the most ardent tent camper who wants to treat him/herself to a well-deserved upgrade while still enjoying the essence of camping.

To find camper cabins near where you live, Google, “Camper Cabins in ______” (type in your state)/.

 

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