John Payne

My Dad, my younger brother ,and I went in the woods and found a good spot to listen from and then we sat down. We sat for five seconds when we heard our first gobble. Then we went about fifty yards and I hooted on my owl call and a closer bird gobbled. We quickly set up and started to call. we never got a another gobble out of that bird. We stood up and started to listen, then we all started to hear a gobbler gobbling on a hillside almost every time a crow cawed. We went what seemed like one hundred yards from the bird and I hit the crow call and he fired right back. We set up my brother’s ameristep four spur blind and a decoy and then I gave a yelp on a box call.

He roared right back at fifty yards. He strutted right up to the decoy with two other toms, but then then they saw something they didn’t like and started to leave. I quickly started to give some soft purrs and clucks (in an I don’t care what you think kind of way) and they circled around to my right for a better look. I put my Mossberg 500’s double bead on his head and squeezed the trigger. My shotgun reported and I looked up and there he was flopping on the ground. I quickly ran over to him and put my foot on his head. He was a two year old bird, he had 1″ spurs, 3 1/2″ beard and was twenty two pounds dressed. I owe this turkey to my brother for letting me borrow his blind, I also owe this turkey to my Dad, if he hadn’t been there I never would have been calm enough to take the shot. And lastly, I owe this turkey to my grandfather. A few years ago he gave me his lynch box call and that is what ignited the flame of passion of a will be life long turkey hunter.

Date: April 07, 2018
Equipment Used: Mossberg 500 shotgun, 2 3/4 no.5 shot
Location: secret honey hole - Bedford County
Pictured (left to right): Joe, John, and Matthew Payne
Trophy Size: 22lb. 1" spurs 3 1/2" beard
Trophy Species: Turkey
Story: My Dad, my younger brother ,and I went in the woods and found a good spot to listen from and then we sat down. We sat for five seconds when we heard our first gobble. Then we went about fifty yards and I hooted on my owl call and a closer bird gobbled. We quickly set up and started to call. we never got a another gobble out of that bird. We stood up and started to listen, then we all started to hear a gobbler gobbling on a hillside almost every time a crow cawed. We went what seemed like one hundred yards from the bird and I hit the crow call and he fired right back. We set up my brother's ameristep four spur blind and a decoy and then I gave a yelp on a box call. He roared right back at fifty yards. He strutted right up to the decoy with two other toms, but then then they saw something they didn't like and started to leave. I quickly started to give some soft purrs and clucks (in an I don't care what you think kind of way) and they circled around to my right for a better look. I put my Mossberg 500's double bead on his head and squeezed the trigger. My shotgun reported and I looked up and there he was flopping on the ground. I quickly ran over to him and put my foot on his head. He was a two year old bird, he had 1" spurs, 3 1/2" beard and was twenty two pounds dressed. I owe this turkey to my brother for letting me borrow his blind, I also owe this turkey to my Dad, if he hadn't been there I never would have been calm enough to take the shot. And lastly, I owe this turkey to my grandfather. A few years ago he gave me his lynch box call and that is what ignited the flame of passion of a will be life long turkey hunter.

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One Response to “John Payne”

  1. Daren Payne

    Nice article – always great to see a young man get his first trophy and start a lifelong love of the outdoors. Gives me hope that we’ll keep the traditions going into the next generation. Nice bird!

    Reply