Starting A Kennel In Today’s Market: Part 2

Here in Part 2, we will discuss more details on how a person can get started in the dog kennel business.

Once you have your financing, the next step is building your kennel facility, and making sure it has the necessities to make yourself competitive with other area kennels. Nowadays most kennel buildings have advanced heating and cooling systems along with adequate air exchange systems. These, however, come with a hefty price tag and should be put in your construction budget. Make sure not to skimp on your facility because your building will be one of the highlights of your business.

A new kennel owner may find himself running heavy equipment digging training ponds.

Develop Land, Add Ponds
The first step is to develop your land as soon as possible. Whether starting with wooded or tillable acreage, landscaping the kennel’s property is a huge priority. However, this too can come with a hefty price tag. Whether it is cutting or planting trees, this all takes time and money. Putting proper and natural cover for training can take more of your resources than initially planned. Creating or digging ponds for water training is essential, but is often difficult depending on the water conditions on the property. If it is not possible to create ponds, finding water to use should be addressed immediately. It is difficult to train a hunting dog to retrieve ducks when you don’t have water to train in!

Now if you have everything necessary for a training kennel your list should include: a 30- to 40-acre property next to a major market, a house suitable for you and your family, a kennel building furnished with updated amenities, and proper training grounds equipped for both upland and water training.

Finding Customers
The only thing you lack at this stage is a customer base to pay for it all! This is probably the most difficult part of the equation. This part will not happen overnight and will take time, money, and patience. However, with a lot of hard work and energy, you just might make a living doing something you enjoy!

A state of the art building is essential when it comes to quality care for dogs.

So if you are contemplating becoming a kennel owner, make sure you look into all of these challenges before you make your final decision. With all of the obstacles a kennel has to deal with in order to be successful, you may think twice before jumping into it. And as a consumer, consider some of these challenges the next time you question costs at your local kennel. Remember, we are doing it for one simple reason, because we love working with dogs!

For a fine selection of Dog Supplies, click here.

Jason Dommeyer has a lifetime of hunting experience and 15 years experience as a dog trainer. He has turned many pets into expert hunting dogs at Cannon River Kennels (http://www.cannonriverkennels.com/) In addition to training hundreds of hunting companions, he has trained dogs for premier pheasant hunting lodges in South Dakota along with duck hunting lodges in Mississippi and Mexico. His experience also includes both hunting and guiding for upland and waterfowl game from Canada to South America. If you have any questions, Jason can be reached at 507-663-6143 or visit (http://www.cannonriverkennels.com/) He provides dog training tips weekly.

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