Fast Thinking! Montana Bowhunter Survives Attack by Shoving Arm Down Grizzly’s Throat!

A Montana bowhunter is recovering after he survived a grizzly bear mauling by remembering a tip from his grandmother and shoving his arm down the animal’s throat, according to the Great Falls Tribune.

Chase Dellwo, 26, was hunting with his brother northwest of the town of Choteau on October 3 when he came face-to-face with a 350- to 400-pound male grizzly, the Great Falls Tribune reported. Choteau is about 58 miles northwest of Great Falls.

Dellwo was walking up a creek bed, hoping to drive a herd of elk to a ridge where his brother was waiting.

He was only three feet from the bear when he noticed it. He said the grizzly had been sleeping and didn’t see him coming, possibly because of the snow, rain and 30- to 40 mph winds.

Dellwo said he only had time to take a few steps back before the bear knocked him off his feet and bit his head.

“He let go, but he was still on top of me roaring the loudest roar I have ever heard,” Dellwo told the newspaper.

The bear then bit Dellwo’s leg and shook him, tossing him in the air. As the bear came at the man again, Dellwo recalled a story he read in a magazine.

“I remembered an article that my grandmother gave me a long time ago that said large animals have bad gag reflexes,” he said. “So I shoved my right arm down his throat.”

The advice worked, and the bear left.

Dellwo rejoined his brother, who drove him to a hospital. Dellwo received stitches and staples in his head, some on his face, a swollen eye, and deep puncture wounds on his leg.

“I want everyone to know that it wasn’t the bear’s fault. He was as scared as I was,” Dellwo said.

 

(Top Photo: Chase Dellwo, 26, poses for a photo at Benefis Health System in Great Falls, Mont., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. (courtesy of Jo Dee Black/The Great Falls Tribune via AP)

 

Have any of our Guide Outdoors Readers have to fend off an animal attack? Please comment below.

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