Self-Defense Deer Hunting

Nov. 22, 2005 — The last thing Jake Walkowiak thought might happen while taking part in an urban bowhunt in his hometown of Duluth, Minn., was that he would become the hunted, instead of the hunter. That’s before an irate doe decided to use the archer for a little boxing practice last week. Among our additional weekly servings, you’ll read about a real primitive hunting weapon, an Iowa pheasant dog that thrives afield, despite being sightless — and more!

READ MORE ›

Good Lab Work

Nov. 16, 2005 — Longtime readers of The Outdoor News Hound know that in addition to offbeat wildlife tales, we’re always on the lookout for good dog stories. This week’s lead story is a pretty special tale about how an Iowa duck hunter was saved from drowning last week by his best friend, a black Labrador retriever named Junior. We’ll also inform you that waterfowlers have no need to worry about the avian flu virus, some news about the growth of fishing, and more!

READ MORE ›

Keep Your Gun Dog Healthy In The Field

As we all rejoice in the majesty of yet another hunting season, let me temper the mood for just a minute and talk about the importance of keeping your gun dog safe and sound in the field. Regardless of where you hunt — in the cold of North Dakota, or the heat of Texas — it’s incumbent upon dog owners to make smart decisions in the field to ensure that man’s best friend doesn’t suddenly become man’s lost friend.

READ MORE ›

Bare-Hand Buck

Nov. 9, 2005 — Some hunters prefer to hunt deer using a rifle or shotgun. Others prefer the more challenging methods of black powder or archery. An Arkansas man went about as primitive as you can go in taking deer, when he killed a home-intruding buck using only his bare hands. You’ll also read about how mouth-to-mouth resuscitation saved a hunting dog, and the wild tale about how a Montana catfight ended — in a flash!

READ MORE ›

Critters Gone Wild

Nov. 2, 2005 — It’s November, which is one of our favorite times of the year here at The Outdoor News Hound. Is it because it will soon be time to head afield with the intent of taking some tasty venison to refill the freezer? Well, partly. Mostly it’s because we’re beginning to see a marked increase in the number of news articles reporting incidents of unpredictable — and often humorous — wild critter behavior usually associated with the fall. And, as collectors and purveyors of wild critter tales, we look forward to this time of year with unequaled enthusiasm.

READ MORE ›

Guns, Bows, Muzzleloaders … And Buicks?

Oct. 26, 2005 — Some states’ “choose your weapons” deer seasons restrict hunters to a single hunting method per year, such as rifle, muzzleloader or archery equipment. However, we’re pretty sure that no state allows automobiles as a legal “method-of-take,” as a Wisconsin teen discovered during his court appearance last week. In addition, we also bring you some legislative news important to hunters and shooters in this week’s report.

READ MORE ›

It’s ‘Pictures Tell The Story’ Week

Oct. 19, 2005 — Need proof that it doesn’t take brains to be a wildlife poacher? Authorities in Montana announced last week that illegal hunting charges against two men have been substantiated with videotapes and photos the pair kept to document their alleged wildlife-killing exploits over a 15-year period. And, speaking of pictures telling a story, we also report the truth behind those photographs you might have received via e-mail depicting what appears to be a mule attacking a mountain lion.

READ MORE ›

A Howling Success

Oct. 12, 2005 — Hunters who’ve experienced any degree of success calling-in predators such as coyotes know that the mouth calls commonly used for the purpose can sometimes sound eerily similar to a crying human toddler. Two hunters who were among dozens of volunteers searching for a missing youngster in Missouri last week made a mental note of that similarity when they heard coyotes communicating with howls and yips in the late night fog. Also this week, you’ll read about a hunter who found his quarry waiting for him in his treestand, and more!

READ MORE ›

Healing Through Fishing

Oct. 5, 2005 — Fly-fishing, with its emphasis on extended arm and shoulder motions that guide the fly gently onto the water’s surface, is becoming a popular therapy for women who are recovering from breast cancer surgery. Beyond the helpful aspects of physical exercise, cancer therapists have found that weekend fly-fishing retreats offer recovering patients a mental and spiritual stimulation far beyond anything available inside a hospital. You’ll also read about the progress made in the past year by state sportsmen’s caucuses, why the term “urban hunting” is not an oxymoron, and more!

READ MORE ›